Ads by and articles on the New York State Brewers' Association and the United States Brewers' Association during World War I


Cattaraugus Republican (Cattaraugus, New York), March 29, 1917, page 4

Beer as an Invigorator

Beer is pre-eminent as an invigorator. It has both nutritIve and tonic properties. It is the best antidote to fatigue and as such is demanded both by the manual laborer and the mental worker in all walks of life. Beer relieves nervous strain. It is a tissue builder and therefore is found on tables of famous athletes. It was for this reason that Mr. Ebbetts, in accepting, on behalf of his team, an invitation to dinner, requested that beer be served.

Beer is also invigorating to invalids and convalescents. Frequently when ordinary food is repellent and medicine loathesome, beer is found palatable and refreshing. It repairs the waste of tissue, conserves strength and aids the assimilative and digestive processes. For these reasons it is frequently prescribed by physicians.

T.C. Flanagan, the famous athlete and trainer, is another champion of beer for the athlete. Mr. Flanagan says: "I have always maintained that beer is the best upbuilder and sustainer, next to beefsteak, that a man under a steady grind for long periods can take. There must be a moderation, of course, in this as in other foods, and BEER is an athletic food."

Ninety per cent. of beer consists of water. Pure, potable water is the first requisite in every brewery. Beer contains just enough nutritive solids (about 5 per cent.) to give it a food value, and just enough alcohol (3 to 4 per cent.) to give it snap and zest as a beverage.

6 — Talk No. 7 will appear in this paper a week from to-day

NEW YORK STATE BREWERS' ASSOCIATION

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Side article: "We would request a simple dinner with light beer and no other stimulant. That is our idea of the proper drink for athletes in training."

BROOKLYN NATIONAL LEAGUE BASEBALL CLUB
C.H. Ebbetts
(From N.Y. Evening Journal, July 3, 1909).

The above is an excerpt from a letter of acceptance written by Mr. Ebbetts, President of the Brooklyn National League Ball Team, in reply to an invitation from the editor of the N.Y. Evening Journal, in which the editor invited the ball players to dine as his guests.


The Lake Placid News (Lake Placid, New York), April 6, 1917, page 9

A Question Often Asked

If prohibition does not prohibit, why do brewers oppose it?

We brewers maintain that prohibition effectively prohibits only one thing—the brewing of beer. It does not prohibit the drinking of alcoholic beverages.

A free people have their choice of alcoholic beverages, fermented beverages—like beer and wine—or distilled liquors. Prohibition laws prohibit all choice; for beer, such as the American people have been accustomed to, can only be produced in a well equipped brewery.

Anyone can distil liquor in his own cellar. Moonshine whiskey can be made and the traffic carried on in secret.

It is practically impossible to carry on a moonshine brewery and secret traffic in beer is extremely difficult, expensive and hazardous.

Distilled liquors can be shipped and delivered by the gallon with comparative security from discovery, and with low freight and express charges, whereas beer, being bulky, the charges for shipment are high, quite out of proportion, and it is difficult to conceal its delivery from neighbors and officers of the law.

When the legalized saloon is abolished, illegal substitutes or blind tigers take its place. That is why we say that prohibition does not prohibit, but on the contrary, encourages excess and drunkenness and contempt for law.

Until prohibitionists make and try to enforce a law which makes the drinking of alcoholic beverages a crime, they stand convicted of insincerity.

If it is not a crime to drink alcoholic beverages, it cannot be a crime to procure them. And if it is not a crime to buy them, it cannot be a crime to sell them. But the insincerity of prohibition is well illustrated by the fact that prohibitionists quite generally protest that they do not want to interfere with the right of the individual to drink, but only to stop the legalized traffic.

Still, the reasons they give for prohibition are almost entirely based on their theory that to drink alcoholic beverages is injurious to the drinker and, through him, to society generally, not to the producer and dealer.

It is evident that they really want to stop the individual from using alcoholic drink but are afraid to attack directly his personal rights and go at it in a roundabout way with insincere professions, trying to hit the consumer over the shoulder of the producer and dealer.

7 — Talk No. 8 will appear in this paper a week from to-day.

NEW YORK STATE BREWERS' ASSOCIATION.

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Side article: BEER contains about 92 per cent. water and about 5 per cent. of extract derived from hops and cereal, principally Barley malt, and only about 3 to 4 per cent. alcohol.


Ticonderoga Sentinel (Ticonderoga, Essex County, New York), April 19, 1917, page 3

Beer and Bread

The brewing of beer and the baking of bread have come down through the ages as the two tried and proven preparations of human sustenance.

Both brewing and baking originated somewhere in the dim past beyond the beginnings of history. The two processes are somewhat similar.

The beer of ancient times was probably made from incompletely baked bread. That is to say, when the grain was crushed and set for bread, some of it was put into water and set for beer.

From the earliest days, men have recognized that the natural processes employed in baking bread and brewing beer are closely similar. Modern science confirms and explains this.

In making bread the grain is ground up into flour, mixed with water or milk, and yeast is added. It is then allowed to "rise." This rising or working is due to the fermentation of the yeast. This fermentation produces a gas which makes the bread light.

In the making of beer there is the same fermentation, but it is in liquid and not solid form. Besides, the fermentation of the liquid not being subjected to the heat of an oven is carried farther, and retains most of the alcohol generated and some of the carbonic acid.

Later it was found that better results were obtained if, instead of going part way through the baking process, the grain was prepared by sprouting, which is Nature's process for dissolving the food stored in the grain for the sustenance of the young germ. This process in beer making is called malting.

There is no mystery about beer. All beers are made from an extract of cereal such as barley-malt, rice and corn. In the process of brewing, cereals are converted into sugar. Hops are added to give a slightly bitter taste and pungent flavor. The liquid, after being boiled, is cooled and fermented with yeast.

That is why beer is often called liquid bread.

9 — Talk No. 10 will appear in this paper a week from to-day.

NEW YORK STATE BREWERS' ASSOCIATION.

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Side article: BEER contains about 92 per cent. water and about 5 per cent. of extract derived from hops and cereal, principally Barley malt, and only about 3 to 4 per cent. alcohol.


Cattaraugus Republican (Cattaraugus, New York), May 3, 1917, page 4

Why Do People Drink Beer?

The reason most people drink beer is because it tastes good. The reason they go on drinking beer is because it continues to do them good.

Beer is an ideal beverage. It quenches the thirst, gives nutriment to the body, and cheers up the spirits.

It is a wholesome food. The term "food" includes anything, either solid or liquid, that restores the waste tissues of the body or supplies heat and energy. The food contents of beer are all wholesome and nutritious. Besides being a food it is a beverage; that is, it not only sustains the body, but it satisfies thirst.

It contains just enough alcohol to refresh the system, sharpen the appetite and produce a general feeling of well being.

Beer is pleasing to all the senses. It is good to look at, its aroma is attractive, its taste is snappy and it is ideally adapted to gratify the cravings of the human body.

Centuries of use have established beer as the ideal drink, giving the maximum of pleasure.

10 — Talk No. 11 in this paper a week from to-day

NEW YORK STATE BREWERS' ASSOCIATION.

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Side article: BEER contains about 92 per cent water and about 5 per cent of extract derived from hops and cereal, principally Barley-malt, and only about 3 to 4 per cent alcohol.


The Lake Placid News (Lake Placid, New York), May 11, 1917, page 10

Brewing and Farming

The brewer is the barley farmer's best customer, because he uses a quarter of the barley crop and pays a high premium for all barley of malting quality.

The brewers also use forty million pounds of hops, which have no value for any other purpose.

While the prohibition statement that 625,000,000 bushels of grain is used for alcoholic beverages is enormously and maliciously exaggerated, the making and selling of beer is of very great importance to every barley, hop and dairy farmer in New York State.

This is what the brewers used last year:
WHEAT..........None
OATS.............None
RYE...............None
BARLEY.........48 million bushels
CORN...........10 million bushels
RICE............. 9 million bushels
Total............67 million bushels, or about one per cent of all the gain produced in the United States.

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Side article: BEER contains about 92 per cent water and about 5 per cent of extract derived from hops and cereal, principally Barley-malt, and only about 3 to 4 per cent alcohol.


The Adirondack Record (Au Sable Forks, New York), May 18, 1917, page 3

Beer and Grain Consumption

All of the malt and much of the barley that America is now exporting is used by our allies for beer.

None of the European countries even after two and one-half years of war has stopped the brewing of beer.

The British Liquor Control Commission has not attempted to deprive the people of their beer.

Aside from its use for brewing, barley is seldom used for human food—but principally for feeding cattle.

Sörensen, the Great Danish Authority on Pure Food, States That There is No Waste of Cereals in Brewing Beer.

He has recently demonstrated that when barley is fed to cattle for producing beef, only 51 per cent of the food value is retained—on the other hand, when converted to beer, 61 per cent of the food value of barley is retained in the most easily digested form.

The ignorant or wilful statement as to the amount of grain used for alcoholic beverages is enormously exaggerated. The facts regarding the quantity consumed for that purpose are so readily obtainable from the United States Internal Revenue Department that the failure to produce them points to a deliberate suppression of the truth.

This is what the brewers of the United States used last year (Government figures):
                         Bushels
Wheat...............None
Oats..................None
Rye...................None
Barley...............52,439,973
Corn products.....15,711,515
Rice................... 2,354,000
Total..................70,505,488

35% of the
material is
returned to the
farmer as a better
milk-producing
food than in its
original state..........24,676,920

This leaves.............45,828,568 bushels actually consumed in beer—BEING LESS than ¾ of ONE PER CENT of the grain production of our country.

New York State Brewers' Association

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Side article: BEER contains about 92 per cent water and about 5 per cent of extract derived from hops and cereal, principally barley-malt, and only about 3 to 4 per cent alcohol.


Cattaraugus Republican (Cattaraugus, New York), May 31, 1917, page 5

What is Beer?

Notwithstanding the fact that beer has become the most popular beverage of the United States, a vast number of well-meaning people, who are thoroughly versed in other subjects, have little or no knowledge of beer.

Ninety per cent. of beer consists of water. Pure potable water is the first requisite in every brewery. Beer contains just enough nutritious solids to give it a food value and just enough alcohol (3 to 4 per cent.) to give it snap and zest as a beverage.

Beer, used in moderation, is both a tonic and a strength builder. It is free from disease bearing germs and is one of the few products which pass from manufacturer to consumer without coming in contact with human hands.

Physicians prescribe beer for overworked businessmen, nervous woman and others whose condition indicates the need of a tonic. Famous athletic trainers the world over allow their charges to partake of beer and unhesitatingly declare that it prevents athletes from going stale. In other words, it takes off the "wire" edge so frequently acquired after weeks of hard taining for athletic events.

There is no substitute for beer.

2 — (The next talk in this series will appear in an early issue)

NEW YORK STATE BREWERS' ASSOCIATION

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Side article: BEER contains about 92 per cent. water and about 5 per cent. of extract derived from hops and cereal, principally barley-malt, and only about 3 to 4 per cent. alcohol.


Cattaraugus Republican (Cattaraugus, New York), June 14, 1917, page 7

The Purity of Beer

Beer is one of the purest and cleanest of all food products. Every grain of barley or other cereal is thoroughly freed from dust and other foreign elements and every stage of manufacture, from malting to barreling or bottling, is most carefully guarded as the slightest impurity would be fatal to a brewing. No possible precaution is neglected.

The liquid which ultimately becomes beer must be frequently tested during the process of manufacture, but it is never dipped out of the tank or vat but is always drawn off. The modern brewery is absolutely sanitary.

Beer is one of the few beverages that is absolutely free from bacteria. From the time the raw ingredients enter the brewery until the finished product reaches the consumer, beer is absolutely protected against any form of contamination.

H.E. Barnard, the State Food and Drug Commissioner of Indiana, recently stated: "Beer is a wholesome beverage with a distinctive food value. It contains carbohydrates, albuminoids and mineral materials required in our system; it is appetizing; it aids digestion. The milk and butter men ought to go in a body and visit the breweries of this or other States in order to see how clean a food product establishment can be made. It is a fact that the cleanest and most sanitary food on the market, as food is defined by the Indiana Law, is beer."

When you drink a glass of beer, whether it be draught or bottled, you may rest assured that you are in no danger of ptomaine or other forms of poisoning.

Beer is a pure and temperate drink. It contains about 92 per cent. water and about 5 per cent. of extract derived from hops and cereals, principally barley-malt and only about 3 to 4 per cent. of alcohol.

4 — Talk No. 5 will appear in this paper a week from to-day

NEW YORK STATE BREWERS' ASSOCIATION

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Side article: BEER contains about 92 per cent. water and about 5 per cent. of extract derived from hops and cereal, principally barley-malt, and only about 3 to 4 per cent. alcohol.


Cattaraugus Republican (Cattaraugus, New York), June 21, 1917, page 7

Beer in the Great War

Long ago the French government officially classified beer, wine and cider as "boissons hygieniques" (hygienic beverages) and that it adheres to this view is evinced by it lgislation prompted by the European War, which does not interfere with these products, though it does restrict the use of heavy spirituous liquors and prohibits only the manufacture and sale of absinthe.

Great Britain, despite the protests of some total abstinence organizations, continues to license the sale of alcoholic beverages.

The German Government, recognizing the value of beer, issues it as a ration to the Army, and has requisitioned 20 per cent. of the entire output of all breweries for this purpose.

Although Canada has prohibitory laws in nearly all of its provinces, it permits the unlicensed sale of beer and all alcoholic beverages testing less than two and a half per cent. proof spirits, that is, about one an a quarter per cent. by weight.

Italy, Serbia and Montenegro have made no restrictions on drink.

Russia has prohibited vodka but gives Local communities the optional right of selling beer and other fermented beverages.

A recent Lond Hospital Report says:
"Beer is, par excellence, the nutritive alcoholic beverage.

5 — Talk No. 6 will appear in this paper a week from to-day

NEW YORK STATE BREWERS' ASSOCIATION

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Side article: BEER contains about 92 per cent. water and about 5 per cent. of extract derived from hops and cereal, principally barley-malt, and only about 3 to 4 per cent. alcohol.


The Lake Placid News (Lake Placid, New York), June 29, 1917, page 10

Why Do People Drink Beer?

The reason most people drink beer is because it tastes good. The reason they go on drinking beer is because it continues to do them good.

Beer is an ideal beverage. It quenches the thirst, gives nutriment to the body, and cheers up the spirits.

It is a wholesome food. The term "food" includes anything, either solid or liquid, that restores the waste tissues of the body or supplies heat and energy. The food contents of beer are all wholesome and nutritious. Besides being a food it is a beverage; that is, it not only sustains the body but it satisfies thirst.

It contains just enough alcohol to refresh the system, sharpen the appetite and produce a general feeling of well being.

Beer is pleasing to all the senses. It is good to look at, its aroma is attractive, its taste is snappy and it is ideally adapted to gratify the cravings of the human body.

Centuries of use have established beer as the ideal drink, giving the maximum of pleasure.

10 — Talk No. 11 will appear in this paper a week from to-day

NEW YORK STATE BREWERS' ASSOCIATION

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Side article: BEER contains about 92 per cent water and about 5 per cent of extract derived from hops and cereal, principally Barley-malt, and only about 3 to 4 per cent alcohol.


The Evening World (New York, New York), November 22, 1917, page 21

The Brewers to the Public

Our Federal Laws, now for the first time in our history, absolutely prohibit the distillation of ardent spirits—such as whiskey, brandy, gin and the like. In doing so they make a clear distinction between distilled spirituous liquors and mild beverages—such as beer and light wines.

This distinction set a precedent in our national treatment of the question of Intemperance. It is in line with the teachings of history and of science. It is in harmony with the experience of other countries now at war. It is through such a distinction that the real solution of this vital problem will be found.

Inasmuch as the brewers have reduced the alcohol content of beer until it is today only fractionally in excess of 3 per cent, they have earned the right to call their product a True Temperance Drink. Yet, in general popular opinion, it is still associated with ardent spirits.

The true relationship of beer is with light wines and soft drinks—not with hard liquors.

For this false mental association the brewers are largely responsible. Keen competition in the early days of the brewing industry, before the perfection of modern bottling methods, led the brewers as individuals to encourage the establishment of saloons, which were at that time the only agencies through which their product could be lawfully sold. This unwise individual action on the part of many led to an undue multiplication of the saloon—a form of retail distribution which dealt not only in malt beverages but also in intoxicating liquors, and established a business affiliation that has since created the false mental association.

Thus our product has been unjustly and improperly linked with those influences—over which we have had no control—that have actually promoted Intemperance.

For years we hoped, with the wine growers, that some factor might intervene which would enable us to sever, once and for all, the shackles that bound our wholesome products—light wines and beer, the handmaidens of True Temperance—to ardent spirits in popular mental association and actual business practice. The Federal enactment prohibiting the distillation of spirituous liquors has broken those chains at last.

Freed now to speak for the great moral truth of temperance that we have long realized was ours—heartened by the action of Congress and the President—we welcome the opportunity that is thus afforded us to promote True Temperance. Further, we pledge ourselves to co-operate with the spirit of the law by adding our utmost efforts to dissociate beer from distilled liquors in every way, in popular thought and in the saloon.

This will the Federal laws and our practise operate to eliminate the evils of Intemperance and to place our country upon a basis of Temperance—REAL Temperance, which means sobiety and moderation: not Prohibition, which has proved a fallacy and a failure.

The United States Brewers' Association


The Evening World (New York, New York), December 10, 1917, page 12

The Basis of True Temperance

"Temperance to be a virtue must be free and not forced," said an eminent Boston divine—the Rev. Dr. Cyrus A. Bartol—many years ago, and in that one sentence he crystalized the whole moral truth of the Temperance question.

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In 1907 the French Academy of Moral and Political Sciences awarded the first prize for the best essay on The Struggle against Alcoholism to Dr. L. Viaud, out of many competitors. In its published form, with a preface of endorsement by Dr. Emil Cheysson, president of the French National League Against Alcohol, Dr. Viaud voiced the scientific truth that the consumption of wine and beer, far from being "a necessary evil" for which a remedy is to be found is, in fact, the ANTIDOTE FOR ALCOHOLISM.

The United States Brewers' Association.


The Evening World (New York, New York), December 12, 1917, page 16

Mr. Hoover's Right Idea

MR. HERBERT HOOVER, National Food Administrator, had the right idea when he recently said in an official statement: "Those who wish brewing entirely suppressed should bear in mind that if such a course were pursued THE COUNTRY WOULD BE PLACED UPON A WHISKEY BASIS entirely."

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That is the crux of the True Temperance question which Prohibitionists in the over-zealousness fail to see.

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Mr. Hoover's statement was made in connection with his recommendation that, as a food conservation measure, the alcoholic content of beer be reduced to 2¾ per cent.

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In the brewing of beer, alcohol is not sought by the brewer, but is an incident to the process through natural fermentation.

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The new 2¾ per cent. American beers will be similar to those so popular in Norway, Denmark and Sweden, where, on account of their low percentage of alcohol, they are classed among the True Temperance drinks, and to encourage their consumption ARE MADE TAX FREE.

The United States Brewers' Association


The Evening World (New York, New York), December 13, 1917, page 16

The Lesson of France

France—once a most sober country, when its alcoholic consumption was largely in the form of light wines and beer—has, in later days, been confronted with the Problem of Alcoholism. The growth of the absinthe and brandy habit in the northern provinces raised a question that was met at the outbreak of the war by an agitation for Prohibition.

_____

A decision has now been reached, which, in accordance to the correspondent of the New York Sun, has "PROFOUNDLY MODIFIED PUBLIC OPINION ON THE LIQUOR QUESTION."

_____

This is the unanimous decision of the army medical authorities to adopt the recommendations of the Academy of Medicine that a liter of wine should be introduced into the daily rations of the soldiers.

_____

A letter left by the late Prof. Landouzy—himself an ardent Prohibitionist—and recently published in the Journal de Medecine of Bordeaux, strongly influenced the decision, for he wrote: "Abstinence from pure wine is everywhere under the sky of France a scientific, economic and historical heresy."

_____

Beer is to the American to-day what wine is to the Frenchman—except that the alcoholic content of American beer is about one-third that of French wine.

_____

Our Government has learned through British experience that it is a necessity in time of war that munitions makers, shipbuilders, miners, and all who perform heavy physical labor, should have some beverage which will stimulate and refresh without intoxicating.

The United States Brewers' Association


Cattaraugus Republican (Cattaraugus, New York), December 13, 1917, page 2

The Pretext

for National Prohibition

The plea for National Prohibition is made on the ground that the Prohibition states could not protect themselves against liquor shipments from "Wet" states.

_____

If a State wants to be "Bone-Dry", it can become so by adopting State Prohibition, with the assurance that the Federal Government will see to it that no liquor is shipped in.

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The amended Webb-Kenyon Law was passed in recognition of the right of each State to adopt its own policy on liquor legislation free from outside interference. For the same reason those States which do not want Prohibition must have the same right of protection for their policy FREE FROM INTERFERENCE.

_____

Coercion by a constitutional amendment of states opposed to Prohibition would be most unfair.

_____

Remember, that once adopted and made a part of the Constitution of the United States, National Prohibition would be VIRTUALLY IRREVOCABLE. However short it might fall of the results expected of it—whatever other evils might arise because of it—however great its failure might be in a National way, even as it has been in State experiments—it would be practically impossible to revoke it. EVEN THOUGH AN OERWHEVLMING [sic] MAJORITY OF THE POPULATION DESIRED ITS REPEAL.

_____

Thirteen of the smallest States of the Union, with a population of less 5,000,000 COULD THEN OVERRULE THE OTHER THIRTY-FIVE STATES WITH A POPULATION OF 95,000,000.

The New York State Brewers' Association


PALMER NAMES FIFTEEN BREWERS WHO HE SAYS RAISED FUNDS TO PURCHASE NEWSPAPER IN INTEREST OF GERMANY

Money Was Loaned to Arthur Brisbane to Buy Washington Times by C.W. Feigenspan on Behalf of Syndicate of Brewing Concerns—Documents Produced by Alien Property Custodian Include Letters From German Agent to Tauscher and Dernberg

(By The Associated Press)

WASHINGTON, Sept. 19—The Federal custodian of alien property, A. Mitchel Palmer, made public today the names of the fifteen brewers, who, with the United States Brewers' Association, raised a fund of $407,000 from which $375,000 was loaned to Arthur Brisbane to buy The Washington Times.

Mr. Palmer acted immediately after the Senate had passed resolutions, introduced by Senator Jones of Washington, calling upon the property custodian to show the proof on which he made the speech in Harrisburg Pa. last Saturday, describing the efforts of brewers to control a newspaper in pro-German interests, to exert their influence upon Congress, and finally upon which he charged that the brewing interests had advanced money for the purchase of a newspaper to "fight the battles of the liquor traffic under the shadow of the dome of the Capitol."

Mr. Brisbane, in published statements in The Times, already has stated that he bought the paper with money loaned by C.W. Feigenspan, a brewer, and president of the Federal Trust Co. of Trenton, N.J. Mr. Brisbane also has published a letter defining an arrangement by which the loan was syndicated among fifteen brewers.

Mr. Palmer included in his disclosures this letter, and also documents to support his assertion that the loan was made in a way to conceal its "true course and purpose."

Included in Mr. Palmer's papers are copies of letters written by Alexander Konta, evidently a German agent, to Captain Hans Tauscher, notoriously associated with German propaganda in the United States, and to Dr. Dernburg, Germany's chief propagandist agent, upon the prospect of buying some great American newspaper.

Mr. Palmer connects these with his declaration that the influence which the brewers attempted to exert was thoroughly in the interests of Germany.

Mr. Palmer tonight declined to say where his office obtained the documents. He added that they spoke for themsleves.


The Sun (New York, New York), September 20, 1918, page 8

BREWERY POOL GAVE CASH TO HELP BRISBANE

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Coin Collected in Roundabout Way to Aid in Paper Purchase.

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FEIGENSPAN IS TRUSTEE

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Copies of Checks and Letters Used in Deal Are Shown

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Photographihc copies of checks, letters and promissory notes given out yeaterday by Francis P. Garvan, New York representative of A. Mitchell Palmer, Alien Property Custodian, reveal the source of the funds with which Arthur Brisbane purchased the Washington Times. From these documents it appears that the money was contributed by a pool of wealthy brewers in New York, Milwaukee, Philadelphia and Boston.

Christian W. Feigenspan of Newark acted as trustee for the pool, which included George Ehret of New York, Jules Liebmann of Brooklyn, J.C.G. Hupfel of New York, Jacob Ruppert of New York, Joseph W. Uthlein, general manager of the Schlitz Brewing Company of Milwaukee; Edward Lansberg of Chicago, Reuter & Co. of Boston, A.J. Houghton & Co., William Hamm, Gustave Pabst of Milwaukee, the Fred Miller Brewing Company of Milwaukee, C. Schmidt & Sons of Philadelphia, F.A. Poth & Sons of Philadelphia, the United States Brewers' Association and Bergner & Engel.


The Sun (New York, New York), September 22, 1918, Page 6

An Appeal

By American Brewers

To the American People

The press has in the past few days given much space to the fact that certain American brewers loaned the sum of $375,000 to Mr. Arthur Brisbane, which sum he used in the purchase of the Washington Times.

In many publications referring to this matter the word "German" is applied to the word "brewer," and there is continued and persistent effort to create in the minds of the readers the impression that the brewers are as a class unpatriotic. An attempt to create and foster this impression is to give birth to and nourish what is a malicious and cowardly lie!

MORE THAN NINETY-FIVE PRE CENT OF ALL THE BREWERS IN THE UNITED STATES ARE AMERICAN BORN. AND IN A VERY LARGE PORTION OF CASES THEIR PARENTS WERE AMERICAN BORN.

What money they have, has been made in American business and invested in America. Since the beginning of the war brewers have been among the largest purchasers of every Liberty Bond issue, the total of their subscriptions amounting to many millions of dollars. They have contributed in large amounts to the Red Cross and other war activities.

Brewers themselves are wearing uniforms of service and the sons and grandsons of brewers are fighting under the Stars and Stripes.

In the many acts of disloyalty discovered by the Department of Justice prior to and during the war, there is not one single instance where any brewer, directly or indirectly, has in any way been found guilty of any act which could be considered disloyal.

Much publicity has been given to the fact that before the war commenced brewers of the country contributed money to the German-American Alliance for the purpose of contesting Prohibition. Not one single dollar was ever paid to the German-American Alliance by any brewer after the declaration of war between Germany and our country, and this fact is well known to every man who has investigated this subject.

It has never been shown that any American brewer has contributed, directly or indirectly, to any dissemination of any unpatriotic propaganda!

A few days ago our President issued a proclamation forbidding the manufacture of beer after December 1st. Despite the fact that this order destroys a billion dollars' worth of property, it has been accepted by the brewers without complaint, because they realize that in the judgment of our President such a ruling is necessary to the success of the war programme.

Are certain politicians, disappointed in their ambitions, and those who are opposed to the consumption of any beverage with the slightest trace of alcohol so powerful that they can use the horrors of this distressing war to heap odium and disgrace upon a class of citizens whose loyalty, measured by whatever standard, is one hundred per cent. American?

WE ARE NOT MAKING THIS APPEAR IN BEHALF OF OUR PROPERTY OR OUR PRODUCT, BUT AS AMERICAN CITIZENS APPEALING TO YOU TO HELP PROTECT THE GOOD NAME OF OURSELVES AND OUR FAMILIES.


Westfield Republican (Westfield, New York), September 25, 1918, page 7

NOT ELIMINATED!

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William H. Anderson, State Superintendent of Anti-Saloon League, Says Prohibition Has Not Been Eliminated from This Fall's New York Campaign

It is true that prohibition has been eliminated as an issue in the governorship campaign in the sense that the Democratic administration at Washington in connection with the Democratic congress have entirely cut the ground from under the Tammany candidate's efforts to make a fraudulent use of the prohibition question this fall.

But this excuse for keeping silent will not stop the activity of the liquor interests who have a sworn vengeance against Governor Whitman and have organized to carry out that purpose by their usual stealthy and corrupt methods. The liquor interests will register their followers. Nothing will please them better than to have the moral element get the impression that there is no urgent need to register.

The brewery interests are now engaged in a gigantic propaganda movement to postpone ratification on the ground of waiting to see the operation of war prohibition. Their real reason is the hope expressed by their leaders in statements in my possession that the boys in the army will acquire a taste for alcoholic liquor in France and come home and upset prohibition if it has not been made permanent in the meantime. The brewers have boasted in their trades journals that American soldiers would be furnished liquor and thus cultivate the alcohol habit, insuring the permanence of the liquor traffic for a generation at least.

The methods of the brewers are well illustrated by the statement of Mr. A. Mitchell Palmer, National custodian of Alien Property, who, with the Democratic National Chairman, repudiated the Democratic candidate for Governor of Pensylvania the other day because of liquor alliances, when he said that a dozen or fifteen German brewers furnished the money to buy a great daily in the shadow of the National Capitol. These same brewers will spend millions of dollars in New York state for quiet work this fall because they realize that if New York ratifies their hope is gone. It is no personal reflection upon the Tamany candidate for governor, whose personal loyalty we cheerfully concede, to say that the main beneficiary of his election will be the German brewers, who officially through the United States Brewers Association, which has its offices in New York City, financed the German-American Alliance from the proceeds of a barrel tax on beer, as brought out by the Senate investigating committee.

The last hope remaining to Hun Kulture lies in the perpetuation of the liquor traffic in the hands of German brewers to prevent this country recouping itself through prohibition for the cost of the war. That hope hangs on the election of the Tammany candidate for Governor, who will be delighted to have the soft pedal put on the prohibition question while the brewers quietly line up the votes for him in consideration of his past record of service to them and his present platform attitude.

(signed) William H. Anderson,
State Superintendent, Anti-Saloon League of New York
Sept. 18, 1918


The Evening World (New York, New York), November 20, 1918, page 2

ALLEGED BOYCOTT BY BREWERS IS UP IN SENATE INQUIRY

Secretary of Association Admits Writing Letters Listing Antagonistic Firms.

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Washington, Nov. 20— War waged by brewers against antagonistic business houses and individuals received special attention to-day from the Senate committee investigating beer propaganda and the purchase of the Washington Times by Arthur Brisbane.

Some of the firms said to have been listed for attack because of their Prohibition tendencies were the Cadillac, Packard and Reo automobile companies, the John Wanamaker Company, the H.J. Heinz company, The American Rolling Mills of Middletown, O., the Fox Typewriter Company, the Maryland and Baltimore Casualty company, Proctor & Gamble, and the Grasselli Chemical Company of Cleveland.

Hugh H. Fox, Secretary of the United States Brewers' Association, resumed the stand and was questioned at length by Major E. Lowry Humes, conducting the examination for the committee. The witness, though denying the association had attempted a boycott, identified many letters and circulars sent to members regarding the anti-beer attitude of certain firms and persons.

"My memory is that I acted as a sort of an intermediary in this matter," said Mr. Fox. "I think it was the intention of our association rather to give preference to those who were our friends. I do not think the association took any action to cause a boycott."

The action against the Heinz Company followed the election of H.J. Heinz of Pittsburgh as President of the Pennsylvania State Sunday School Association at the convention of which prohibition sentiments were expressed, according to a letter Fox said he wrote. Another letter showed that the American Rolling Mills was listed because of a poster against the use of liquor by its employees. In the case of the Grasselli Company an official of that concern was referred to as having been active in support of an evangelist.

Fox also admitted authorship of a letter written to Newcomb Carleton, President of Western Union, protesting the attitude of the company in refusing to employ men who were not total abstainers.

SAYS ACTION WAS VIOLATION OF PERSONAL RIGHTS

In his letter Fox explained that he thoroughly approved of temperance and recognized the right of the company to discharge men for intoxication. He maintained, however, that demanding total abstinence was a violation of personal right.

Humes brought out the fact that the letter was written in January and that in the following April the Western Union was named in the unfair list.

The Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company was listed because of an order against the use of liquor by its employees. Major Humes charged, but later a letter was sent by the railroad to its freight solicitors saying it did not object to its employees having liquor in their own homes. Subsequently a letter was sent by the Brewers' Association to its agents in which it was said that the differences with the road had been adjusted.

The Cadillac Company was condemned because of the activity of one of the officials in temperance work, correspondence showed. The Blackstone Hotel in Chicago, Humes contended, lost much patronage from the brewers because of its willingness to obey the Sunday closing order. Fox said he continued to patronize the hotel and often met many brewers there. He declared he was in entire sympathy with the action of the hotel in obeying the Sunday law.

The management, however, he said, was believed to be in sympathy with the dry forces, and, naturally, brewers preferred to patronize places in sympathy with the industry.

Rogers, Peet & Company, clothing dealers of New York, was one of the many concerns condemned by the brewing interests, correspondence showed. "A few more letters will find Rogers, Peet on the anxious seat."

Later, the correspondence showed, a change was made in the organization of the firm and the offending member who had been charged with helping the prohibition forces either resigned or became inactive.


News articles taken from the New York State Historic Newspaper database at http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/
Webpage and transcription Susan Kriegbaum-Hanks, November 9, 2017